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OpenID Connect introduction

OpenID Connect is an authentication standard built on top of OAuth2. From my point of view it has the following key features: It’s a lot simpler than anything involving SAML. Validating SAML requires a full implementation of XML Signature, which requires an implementation of XML Canonicalization, which requires a full XPath implementation. I’m not anti-XML in general, but I don’t think authenticating a user should require parsing, traversing and rearranging a DOM tree multiple times.…

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"Stand back! I know regular expressions!"

For the last few days I’ve been taking part in the Advent of Code. Each day there are a couple of small programming problems to solve in your choice of language. There’s a Reddit community where people discuss the problems and their solutions. After solving the Day 5 problems pretty quickly, I went to the discussions and was a bit surprised to find that everyone was talking about regular expressions.…

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Go: Preliminary verdict

So, how do I feel about Go, now that I know it better? The good On the whole, I like it. Some high points: It’s reasonably terse, and there’s not much syntax to remember. Like Ruby, you can do a lot in not much code, and unlike (say) Java there isn’t really a big need for an IDE. It inherits from Modula-2 a focus on compile-time efficiency. No header files, a compact grammar, and rigid dependency declaration make for rapid compilation times.…

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Review: "The Go Programming Language"

“The Go Programming Language” by Alan A.A. Donovan & Brian W. Kernighan Addison-Wesley Like many other programmers, I learned to write C by reading “The C Programming Language” by Kernighan and Ritchie, the book known to hackers everywhere as “K&R”. I confess that I was initially drawn to “The Go Programming Language” out of sheer Kernighan brand awareness. Would it be the K&R of the Go world? I certainly hoped so, as I have strong preferences when it comes to programming language textbooks.…

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Go

Back when I was 17, I thought C was the greatest programming language in the world. I had started programming in BASIC, messed with assembly language, then discovered Pascal. Both BASIC and Pascal were interpreted, at least in the implementations I had, so C was my first compiled language. Being able to produce machine code without writing assembler was a revelation. Sure, C had rough edges here and there — the type declarations often needed careful thought to decode — but it did the job like nothing else.…

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